Celebrities With Books Friday

matildaMatilda and Moby Dick.

huffingtonpost:

"Christina’s World" by Andrew Wyeth and "What’s Left of Utopia"by Julien Mauve 

See more of Mauve’s photography of a hauntingly beautiful dystopia here.

Relevent.

"

My first serious relationship: I was only there for 3 months before another store wooed me away with the promise of something more serious — and we got serious really fast. I was hired as the assistant events director, but before long I was writing the newsletter, creating the window displays, and redesigning web pages. My life became inseparable from the bookstore. When my shift was over I would stay for upwards of an hour just talking to my coworkers, I was always there on my day off, and outside of my roommate my entire social life was the bookstore.

Those were the golden years of my bookseller life. I eventually left to start grad school in Ireland, but a part of me always wonders if I should have stayed, if I didn’t realize how good I had it. Isn’t your first serious relationship always also the one that got away?

"

Janet Potter,A History of Love (of Bookstores)” (via millionsmillions)

Celebrities With Books Friday

Two for one.

wnyc:

On the 450th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s birth, Studio 360 asks why his words have such lasting influence. And why is it just him? After centuries of dominating the world’s theaters, is it time we let someone else have the spotlight? Could we try Marlowe in the Park? 
http://wnyc.org/2C5sa

wnyc:

On the 450th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s birth, Studio 360 asks why his words have such lasting influence. And why is it just him? After centuries of dominating the world’s theaters, is it time we let someone else have the spotlight? Could we try Marlowe in the Park? 

http://wnyc.org/2C5sa

(Source: grey2scale)

MFA Student Bookshelves: Bryan

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What are you currently reading?

Right now, I’m reading Islands by Aldous Huxley. My all-time favorite book, though, is Wittgenstein’s Mistress by David Markson. 

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Celebrities With Books Friday

lydia

Winona 4 Ever

Celebrities With Books Friday

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You know you do it too.

Ask A Grad Student: Whitney Gaines

What is your preferred genre to write, and why is it your favorite?

Nonfiction. I like poking fun at myself, and I think the stories I have to tell are ones people should hear. I have always considered myself a “serious” writer. Or that all of my writing is serious, even the funny things.

Do you write in other fields besides your favorite, or stick to one genre?

I wrote for competitions a lot until I was a sophomore in high school. Then I switched to playwriting and wrote plays for Curious Theatre in Denver. In college, I wrote mostly fiction (and the occasional love poem to whomever I was dating). Once I graduated, I began my blog. But I always knew I would end up at nonfiction. 

(Whitney’s blog can be found here: Highest Form of Whit.)

Does your writing for your blog tend to intersect with your personal creative work, or do you keep them separate?

I consider my blog just as personal and creative as anything else I write. My blog is about my struggle with an anxiety disorder, so it’s extremely personal and very creative. It’s hard to make panic attacks funny, or phobias funny, but I’m good at it. It resonates with readers and has garnered my blog a lot of attention.

What is your writing process? Can you make yourself write/stick to a steady schedule, or do you have to wait until you feel inspired? 

Oh, god. I wish I had a writing schedule. Sometime it hits me like a train and I have to sit down and write for three hours. Sometimes the words come slowly. But they’re always there. I just have to give myself time to actually sit down and write. As much as I love literary techniques, I’m more concerned with hoping my voice comes through strongly.

 What would you like to accomplish, long-term, with your writing? 

I want to make mental illness not nearly as taboo as it is. I want people with mental health issues to know it’s okay to laugh at themselves, or others. I want the public to know that these things are real, these issues are serious, but I want to ingrain that knowledge in a way that’s humorous. Humor is the fastest way to truth, I think. 

What authors have influenced your own work the most (whether with their writing, or with their personal qualities/beliefs)? 

Tolkien, obviously. The world he created required so much creativity. It’s hard not to be inspired by that. But I love David Sedaris, Dave Rakoff, and Bill Bryson. Also, Jeanette Walls. Really, I could list authors and books forever (Joe Meno, Kurt Vonnegut, Christopher Durang, and Mark Z. Danielewski have all influenced me at some point or another). I’m influenced by everything I read, because I like to consider how it’s put together and how sentences are woven throughout a piece. 

Do you think your work covers new ground, or discusses familiar concepts in a new way? 

I think my writing discusses something that is only ever discussed clinically: mental health. It’s definitely familiar, but I think my tongue-in-cheek approach to it has made it very accessible for people.

Interviewed by Emmett Haq

It is possible to write an urban fantasy novel featuring vampires who aren’t having sex. But then multiple agents and editors will tell you it’s nonpublishable. Thanks, Twlight.

lolmythesis:

Writing Popular Fiction, Seton Hill University


So true!

eatsleepdraw:

"Smart Is Sexy" by abstractika.tumblr.com
Thanks for looking :)

eatsleepdraw:

"Smart Is Sexy" by abstractika.tumblr.com

Thanks for looking :)

(via libraryjournal)

"The only thing success prepares you for is nothing."

— Deep Thoughts from an MFA Professor

"What a blessing it is to love books. Everybody must love something, and I know of no objects of love that give such substantial and unfailing returns as books and a garden."

— Elizabeth von Arnim (via cajunmama)

(via unabridgedbookstore)

This meshes nicely with our Friday Celebrities With Books theme.

Seven Books by Celebrity Authors That Aren’t TerribleVia The Airship

1. The Woman Who Wouldn’t by Gene Wilder
Most of us remember Wilder for his creepy performance as Mr. Wonka inWilly Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, but after his days of oompa loompas were over, the actor took up writing love stories — and was actually pretty good at it! The Woman Who Wouldn’t, which tells the story of a 1903 violinist looking for love, was deemed “poignant and whimsically romantic” by Publisher’s Weekly. Wilder even gives Chekhov a cameo in the novel, illustrating that he knows as much about literature as he does about Wonka Bars.
2. Shopgirl by Steve Martin

If you’re one of those people who (rightfully) believes that the book is always better than the movie, rejoice: Although the film adaptation of Martin’s novel wasn’t a success, his book received rave reviews. The story of a lonely store worker, Shopgirl is a surprisingly sad pursuit compared to the rest of the comedian’s work. Martin should actually consider making the jump to tragedy in film as well, as Shopgirl spent 15 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list.
3. In His Own Write & A Spaniard in the Works by John Lennon
Lennon once famously declared “It’s weird not to be weird,” so it’s no surprise that his short stories feature plot lines like a cow’s milk emerging pre-bottled. Though his book might be too off-the-wall for some readers, it received generally positive reviews, with The London Sunday Times declaring, “It is fascinating, of course, to climb inside a Beatle’s head to see what’s going on there, but what counts is that what’s going on there is really fascinating.”
4. The Gun Seller by Hugh Laurie

Laurie is sort of like an older, less embarrassing version of James Franco in that he dabbles in multiple forms of art outside of his acting career. When he’s not starring on House or playing hits from his latest blues album, Didn’t It Rain, Laurie is writing spoofs on spy novels for teenagers. The Gun Seller, his first, was called “engaging” and “pleasantly different” by School Library Journal.
5. The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy & Other Stories by Tim Burton

With plot lines that would make even Roald Dahl cringe, Burton’s work tells the stories of outcast children, like a character named Mummy Boy who meets a tragic ending when he’s mistaken for a piñata. For all its gruesomeness, The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy has touching and humorous moments, too; Burton writes of a character named Brie Boy: “The other children never let Brie Boy play … but at least he went well with a nice Chardonnay.” Although all the stories in Burton’s book are about children, make sure you don’t save this one for a bedtime read for your first-grader.
6. Between the Bridge and the River by Craig Ferguson

While not a huge celebrity, Ferguson is on TV enough that you might have doubts about his novel-writing capabilities.Between the Bridge and the River tells the story of two Scottish childhood friends and two Southern illegitimate half-brothers on a bizarre journey during which they encounter everyone from snake handlers to dead historical figures. If Ferguson’s book sounds weird that’s because it is. But it’s also surprisingly poignant, and as any novel that features a main character obsessed with both alcohol and knitwear must be, it’s hysterically funny.
7. Man in White by Johnny Cash

It’s surprising enough when a celebrity writes a well-received book, but when that well-received book happens to be Biblical fiction, that’s when things really get interesting. Cash’s work tells the story of the Apostle Paul and his conversion while journeying to Damascus. Though the plot line might not thrill you, keep in mind that Cash’s book has accomplished a feat nearly impossible for any novel, let alone one written by a celebrity: not a single one-star review.

This meshes nicely with our Friday Celebrities With Books theme.

Seven Books by Celebrity Authors That Aren’t Terrible
Via The Airship

1. The Woman Who Wouldn’t by Gene Wilder

Most of us remember Wilder for his creepy performance as Mr. Wonka inWilly Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, but after his days of oompa loompas were over, the actor took up writing love stories — and was actually pretty good at it! The Woman Who Wouldn’t, which tells the story of a 1903 violinist looking for love, was deemed “poignant and whimsically romantic” by Publisher’s Weekly. Wilder even gives Chekhov a cameo in the novel, illustrating that he knows as much about literature as he does about Wonka Bars.

2. Shopgirl by Steve Martin

If you’re one of those people who (rightfully) believes that the book is always better than the movie, rejoice: Although the film adaptation of Martin’s novel wasn’t a success, his book received rave reviews. The story of a lonely store worker, Shopgirl is a surprisingly sad pursuit compared to the rest of the comedian’s work. Martin should actually consider making the jump to tragedy in film as well, as Shopgirl spent 15 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list.

3. In His Own Write & A Spaniard in the Works by John Lennon

Lennon once famously declared “It’s weird not to be weird,” so it’s no surprise that his short stories feature plot lines like a cow’s milk emerging pre-bottled. Though his book might be too off-the-wall for some readers, it received generally positive reviews, with The London Sunday Times declaring, “It is fascinating, of course, to climb inside a Beatle’s head to see what’s going on there, but what counts is that what’s going on there is really fascinating.

4. The Gun Seller by Hugh Laurie

Laurie is sort of like an older, less embarrassing version of James Franco in that he dabbles in multiple forms of art outside of his acting career. When he’s not starring on House or playing hits from his latest blues album, Didn’t It Rain, Laurie is writing spoofs on spy novels for teenagers. The Gun Seller, his first, was called “engaging” and “pleasantly different” by School Library Journal.

5. The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy & Other Stories by Tim Burton

With plot lines that would make even Roald Dahl cringe, Burton’s work tells the stories of outcast children, like a character named Mummy Boy who meets a tragic ending when he’s mistaken for a piñata. For all its gruesomeness, The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy has touching and humorous moments, too; Burton writes of a character named Brie Boy: “The other children never let Brie Boy play … but at least he went well with a nice Chardonnay.” Although all the stories in Burton’s book are about children, make sure you don’t save this one for a bedtime read for your first-grader.

6. Between the Bridge and the River by Craig Ferguson

While not a huge celebrity, Ferguson is on TV enough that you might have doubts about his novel-writing capabilities.Between the Bridge and the River tells the story of two Scottish childhood friends and two Southern illegitimate half-brothers on a bizarre journey during which they encounter everyone from snake handlers to dead historical figures. If Ferguson’s book sounds weird that’s because it is. But it’s also surprisingly poignant, and as any novel that features a main character obsessed with both alcohol and knitwear must be, it’s hysterically funny.

7. Man in White by Johnny Cash

It’s surprising enough when a celebrity writes a well-received book, but when that well-received book happens to be Biblical fiction, that’s when things really get interesting. Cash’s work tells the story of the Apostle Paul and his conversion while journeying to Damascus. Though the plot line might not thrill you, keep in mind that Cash’s book has accomplished a feat nearly impossible for any novel, let alone one written by a celebrity: not a single one-star review.

(Source: politicsprose)

Celebrities With Books Friday

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Sexy books.